Talk to Your Child About Alcohol - Introduction

Talk to Your Child About Alcohol - Introduction

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With so many drugs available to young people these days, you may wonder, "Why develop a booklet about helping kids avoid alcohol?" Alcohol is a drug, as surely as cocaine and marijuana are. It''s also illegal to drink under the age of 21. And it''s dangerous. Kids who drink are more likely to:

  • Be victims of violent crime.
  • Have serious problems in school.
  • Be involved in drinking-related traffic crashes.

This guide is geared to parents and guardians of young people ages 10 to 14. Keep in mind that the suggestions on the following pages are just that suggestions. Trust your instincts. Choose ideas you are comfortable with, and use your own style in carrying out the approaches you find useful. Your child looks to you for guidance and support in making life decisions including the decision not to use alcohol.

But my child isn''t drinking yet," you may think. "Isn''t it a little early to be concerned about drinking?" Not at all. This is the age when some children begin experimenting with alcohol. Even if your child is not yet drinking alcohol, he or she may be receiving pressure to drink. Act now. Keeping quiet about how you feel about your child''s alcohol use may give him or her the impression that alcohol use is OK for kids.

It''s not easy.

As children approach adolescence, friends exert a lot of influence. Fitting in is a chief priority for teens, and parents often feel shoved aside. Kids will listen, however. Study after study shows that even during the teen years, parents have enormous influence on their children''s behavior.

The bottom line is that most young teens don''t yet drink. And parents'' disapproval of youthful alcohol use is the key reason children choose not to drink. So make no mistake: You can make a difference.

YOUNG TEENS AND ALCOHOL: THE RISKS

For young people, alcohol is the drug of choice. In fact, alcohol is used by more young people than tobacco or illicit drugs. Although most children under age 14 have not yet begun to drink, early adolescence is a time of special risk for beginning to experiment with alcohol.

While some parents and guardians may feel relieved that their teen is "only" drinking, it is important to remember that alcohol is a powerful, mood-altering drug. Not only does alcohol affect the mind and body in often unpredictable ways, but teens lack the judgment and coping skills to handle alcohol wisely. As a result: